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 Locals in flood-hit Burma help to transport part of a water purification plant across a waterway. Locals in flood-hit Burma help to transport part of a water purification plant across a waterway. Photo: MSB

Water purification for the affected population and field staff

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The MSB's preparedness for water purification has two main purposes - partly to support an affected population in the form of bulk water purification and partly as an integral part of the MSB's own modules and projects, for instance, in setting up a base camp or as support for deployed USAR teams.
Contact

Andreas Nilsson

Phone +46 771-240 240

 
The MSB's capability to provide water purification resources is included in the agreement with the UNHCR. Furthermore, Sweden via the MSB, has registered a water purification module with the ECHO MIC. This means that the equipment is ready, but does not necessarily need to be deployed following a request.
 
Water purification as a specific module (i.e. to support an affected population) was requested in 2010 on three occasions: once to Haiti (national organisation) and twice to Pakistan (NDMA and Unicef).

In Haiti the request did not lead to an operation, due to weak reception capacity and ambiguity over funding. In Pakistan the MSB conducted two relatively extensive water purification operations, one via the NDMA the other via Unicef.

Preparedness for water purification

The MSB’s current equipment readiness for water purification, both for direct operations and support for its own modules:
  • Three 6000 bulk water purification plants with a capacity of 6000 l / h, and with a water quality that meets Sphere standards. These are intended for operations to provide direct assistance to an affected population. This is a stand-alone plant.
  • Three 1500 water purification plants with a capacity of 1500 l / h. This plant is also used in base camps and in that case is connected to an RO 500 water purification plant. One of three of these water purification plants is intended for operations to provide direct assistance to an affected population. This is a stand-alone plant.
  • Seven RO 500 water purification plants with a capacity of 500 l / h to provide drinking water that meets EU standards for drinking water. This water purification plant is also used by USAR.
Experience from water purification operations in 2010 shows that more staff are needed than estimated earlier to install and operate a water purification plant and to ensure an uninterrupted water supply.
 
Competence profiles are available on the Field Staff Roster for readiness for water purification modules, water engineers and water experts (including a few water engineers).
 
Deployment time: The deployment time for the 6000 bulk water purification plant is 24 hours for the 1500 water purification plant and the RO 500 water purification plant it is 6 hours. Deployment time means the time from a decision being taken to deploy to the plant being ready for transportation.
 
A girl in Kot Addu in Pakistan collects drinking water from one of the water purification plants that the MSB installed after the terrible floods in 2010. Photo: Anna HjärneA girl in Kot Addu in Pakistan collects drinking water from one of the water purification plants that the MSB installed after the terrible floods in 2010. Photo: Anna Hjärne
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 One of the three water purification plants the MSB sent to Pakistan following the major flooding in 2010. Photo: Anna Hjärne
One of the three water purification plants the MSB sent to Pakistan following the major flooding in 2010. Photo: Anna Hjärne
 
Two of the water tanks that the MSB installed in Kot Addu in Pakistan following the major flooding in 2010. Photo: Anna Hjärne
Two of the water tanks that the MSB installed in Kot Addu in Pakistan following the major flooding in 2010. Photo: Anna Hjärne
 
This smaller water purification plant provides the MSB:s SWIFT USAR (Swedish International Fast Response Team - Urban Search and Rescue) team with drinking water. Photo: Stig Dahlén
This smaller water purification plant provides the MSB:s SWIFT USAR (Swedish International Fast Response Team - Urban Search and Rescue) team with drinking water. Photo: Stig Dahlén
 
Published: 2012-06-20 kl. 14:01
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